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Arsenal Football Club is an
English professional football
club based in Holloway, North
London. The club was founded
under the name Dial Square in
1886 by workers at the Royal
Arsenal in Woolwich, and
renamed Royal Arsenal shortly
afterwards.[1] After turning
professional in 1891 the club
changed its name once again,
this time to Woolwich Arsenal.
[2] The club entered English
football’s premier knockout
tournament, the FA Cup, for
the first time in the 1889–90
season,[3] and joined the
Football League four years
later.[4] In 1913 the club
relocated away from Woolwich
to the new Arsenal Stadium in
Highbury, and a year later
shortened its name to Arsenal.
[5]
The list encompasses the
major honours won by
Arsenal, records set by the
club, their managers and their
players.
Honours
Domestic
First Division / Premier
League (level 1)
Winners (13): 1930–31,
1932–33, 1933–34, 1934–
35, 1937–38, 1947–48,
1952–53, 1970–71, 1988–
89, 1990–91, 1997–98,
2001–02, 2003–04
Runners-up (8): 1925–26,
1931–32, 1972–73, 1998–
99, 1999–2000, 2000–01,
2002–03, 2004–05
Second Division (level 2)
Runners-up (1): 1903–04
FA Cup
Winners (10): 1930, 1936,
1950, 1971, 1979, 1993,
1998, 2002, 2003, 2005
Runners-up (7): 1927, 1932,
1952, 1972, 1978, 1980, 2001
League Cup
Winners (2): 1987, 1993
Runners-up (5): 1968, 1969,
1988, 2007, 2011
FA Community Shield (FA
Charity Shield before 2002)[6]
Winners (12): 1930, 1931,
1933, 1934, 1938, 1948,
1953, 1991 (shared), 1998,
1999, 2002, 2004
Runners-up (7): 1935, 1936,
1979, 1989, 1993, 2003, 2005
Mercantile Credit Centenary
Trophy
Winners (1): 1988–89
European
UEFA Champions League
Runners-up (1): 2005–06
European Cup Winners’ Cup
Winners (1): 1993–94
Runners-up (2): 1979–80,
1994–95
UEFA Cup
Runners-up (1): 1999-00
UEFA Super Cup
Runners-up (1): 1994
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup
Winners (1): 1969–70
↑Jump back a section
Player records
Appearances
Youngest first-team player:
Cesc Fàbregas – 16 years,
177 days (against Rotherham
United, League Cup, 28 October
2003)[7]
Oldest first-team player:
Jock Rutherford – 41 years
159 days (v. Manchester City,
First Division, 20 March 1926)
[8][9]
Most consecutive
appearances: Tom Parker –
172 (3 April 1926 – 26
December 1929)[8]
Most separate spells with
the club: Hugh McDonald – 3
(1905–06; 1908–1910 &
1912–13)[10]
Most appearances
Competitive matches only,
includes appearances as
substitute. Numbers in
brackets indicate goals
scored.
# Name Years League
1 Republic David
O’Leary
1975–
1993
558
(11)
2 England Tony
Adams
1983–
2002
504
(32)
3 England
George
Armstrong
1961–
1977
500
(53)
4 England Lee
Dixon
1988–
2002
458
(25)
5 England Nigel
Winterburn
1987–
2000
440
(8)
6England David
Seaman
1990–
2003
405
(0)
7 Northern Pat
Rice
1964–
1980
397
(12)
8England Peter
Storey
1965–
1977
391
(9)
9 England John
Radford
1964–
1976
379
(111)
10 England Peter
Simpson
1964–
1978
370
(10)
Goalscorers
Most goals in a season: Ted
Drake, 44 goals (in the 1934–
35 season)[11]
Most league goals in a
season: Ted Drake, 42 goals (in
the 1934–35 season)[11]
Most goals in a 38–game
league season: Thierry Henry,
30 goals (in the 2003–04
season), Robin Van Persie, 30
goals (in the 2011–12 season)
[11]
Most league goals in a
calendar year: Jack Lambert,
36 goals in 1930; Ted Drake, 36
goals in 1935; Joe Baker, 36
goals in 1963.
Most goals in a single match:
Ted Drake, 7 goals (against
Aston Villa, 14 December 1935)
[11]
Youngest goalscorer: Cesc
Fabregas, 16 years, 212 days
(against Wolverhampton
Wanderers, League Cup, 2
December 2003)[11]
Youngest hat-trick scorer:
John Radford, 17 years, 315
days (against Wolverhampton
Wanderers, 2 January 1965)
[11]
Oldest goalscorer: Jock
Rutherford, 39 years, 352 days
(against Sheffield United, 20
September 1924)[11]
Top Goalscorers
Competitive matches only.
Numbers in brackets indicate
appearances made.
# Name Years League F
Cu
1 France
Thierry
Henry
1999–
2007
&
2012
176
(258) (2
2 England Ian
Wright
1991–
1998
128
(221)
1
(1
3 England
Cliff
Bastin
1929–
1947
150
(350)
2
(4
4 England
John
Radford
1964–
1976
111
(379)
1
(4
5 England
Ted
Drake
1934–
1945
124
(168)
1
(1
6 England
Jimmy
Brain
1923–
1931
125
(204)
1
(2
7 England
Doug
Lishman
1948–
1956
125
(226)
1
(1
8 Netherlands
Robin
van
Persie
2004–
2012
96
(193)
1
(1
9 England
Joe
Hulme
1926–
1938
107
(333)
1
(3
10 England
David
Jack
1928–
1934
113
(181)
1
(2
International
First capped player: Caesar
Jenkyns (for Wales v.
Scotland, 21 March 1896)[12]
First capped player for
England: Jimmy Ashcroft
(against Ireland, 17 February
1906)[13]
Most capped Arsenal player
for England while playing for
the club: Kenny Sansom, 77
caps whilst an Arsenal player
[12]
First Arsenal players to
play in a World Cup: Dave
Bowen and Jack Kelsey (for
Wales v. Hungary, 8 June 1958)
First players to play in a
World Cup for England: Graham
Rix and Kenny Sansom (v.
France, 16 June 1982)
Note: Laurie Scott and
George Eastham were called
up to England squads (1950,
and 1962 & 1966,
respectively), but did not
play.
First players to play in a
World Cup final: Emmanuel
Petit and Patrick Vieira (as
substitute) for France v.
Brazil (12 July 1998)
First players to win a World
Cup winners’ medal: Emmanuel
Petit and Patrick Vieira (1998
FIFA World Cup)
NB Cesc Fàbregas has
subsequently won a medal
at 2010 FIFA World Cup. In
2007, George Eastham was
retrospectively awarded a
medal for being a non-
playing member of England’s
1966 World Cup-winning
side.[14]Alan Ball, Thierry
Henry, Robert Pirès and
Gilberto Silva have also won
World Cup winners’ medals,
but not while with Arsenal.
First players to play in a
European Championship: Kenny
Sansom & Tony Adams for
England, Niall Quinn (as
substitute) for Republic of
Ireland in the match between
the two (12 June 1988)
First players to play in a
European Championship final:
Patrick Vieira and Thierry
Henry for France v. Italy (2
July 2000)
First players to win a
European Championship
winners’ medal: Emmanuel
Petit, Patrick Vieira and
Thierry Henry (all Euro 2000).
NB Cesc Fàbregas has
subsequently won a medal
at Euro 2008. John Jensen,
Santi Cazorla, Robert Pirès
and Sylvain Wiltord have
also won European
Championship winners’
medals, but not while with
Arsenal.[15]
Transfers
For consistency, fees in the
record transfer tables below
are all sourced from the
Evening Standard’s
contemporary reports of each
transfer. Where the report
mentions an initial fee
potentially rising to a higher
figure depending on
contractual clauses being
satisfied in the future, only the
initial fee is listed in the
tables.
Record transfer fees paid
# Fee Paid to
1 £13m Bordeaux FR
2 £12m Zenit St.
Petersburg RU
3 £12m Marseille FR
= £12m Malaga ES
5 £10.9m Cologne GE
Record transfer fees
received
# Fee Received
from
1 £29.8m Barcelona ES
2 £25m Barcelona NE
= £25m Manchester
City TO
4 £23.5m Real Madrid FR
5 £22.5m Manchester
United NE
↑Jump back a section
Managerial records
First full-time manager:
Thomas Mitchell – Mitchell
was manager of Arsenal for 1-
year
Longest-serving manager:
Arsène Wenger – 16 years,
325 days (1 October 1996 to
present)
↑Jump back a section
Club records
Matches
Firsts
First match: Eastern
Wanderers 0–6 Royal Arsenal,
Friendly, 11 December
1886[26]
First FA Cup match: Royal
Arsenal 11–0 Lyndhurst, First
Qualifying Round, 5 October
1889[27]
First Football League match:
Woolwich Arsenal 2–2
Newcastle United, Second
Division, 2 September 1893[28]
[29]
First match at Highbury:
Woolwich Arsenal 2–1
Leicester Fosse, Second
Division, 6 September 1913[28]
First European match:
Stævnet (Copenhagen XI) 1–7
Arsenal, Inter-Cities Fairs Cup,
25 September 1963[28]
First League Cup match:
Arsenal 1–1 Gillingham, 13
September 1966[28]
First match at Emirates
Stadium: Arsenal 2–1 Ajax
Amsterdam, Testimonial match,
22 July 2006[28]
Record wins
Record win: 26–1 (against
Paris XI, 5 December 1904)[30]
Record league win: 12–0
(against Loughborough, 12
March 1900)[31]
Record FA Cup win: 12–0
(against Ashford United, 14
October 1893)[31]
Arsenal beat Clapton Orient
15–2 in a wartime cup tie on
8 February 1941, but this is
not counted as an official
first-class match.[32][33]
Record Premier League win:
[31]
7–0 against Everton, 11
May 2005
7–0 against Middlesbrough,
14 January 2006
Record League Cup win –
7–0 (home v. Leeds United, 4
September 1979)[31]
Record European win:[31]
[34]
7–0 against Standard Liège,
Cup Winners’ Cup, 3
November 1993
7–0 against Slavia Prague,
Champions League, 23
October 2007
Record away win: 7–0
(against Standard Liège, UEFA
Cup Winners’ Cup, 3 November
1993)[31]
Record defeats
Record league defeat:[a] 0–
8 (against Loughborough,
Second Division, 12 December
1896)[31]
Record FA Cup defeat:[31]
0–6 against Sunderland, 21
January 1893
0–6 against Derby County,
28 January 1899
0–6 against West Ham
United, 5 January 1946
Record Premier League
defeat: 2–8 (against
Manchester United, 28 August
2011)[31]
Record League Cup defeat:
0–5 (against Chelsea, 11
November 1998)[31]
Record European defeat: 0–
4 (against AC Milan, UEFA
Champions League, 15
February 2012)[35]
Record home defeat: 0–6
(against Derby County, FA Cup,
28 January 1899)[31]
Record away defeat: 0–8
(against Loughborough, Second
Division, 12 December 1896)
[31]
Record consecutive
results
Most consecutive wins
overall: 14 (12 September to
11 November 1987)[36]
Most consecutive league
wins: 14 (10 February to 18
August 2002)[36][37]
Most consecutive wins
coming from behind: 4 (11
February – 12 March 2012)
Most consecutive draws: 6
(3 March – 1 April 1961)[36]
Most consecutive losses
overall: 8 (12 February to 12
March 1977)[36]
Most consecutive league
losses: 7 (12 February to 12
March 1977)[36]
Most consecutive matches
unbeaten: 28 (9 April 2007 to
24 November 2007)[36]
Most consecutive matches
unbeaten in the league: 49 (7
May 2003 to 16 October 2004)
[36]
Goals
Most league goals scored in
a season: 127 in 42 matches,
First Division, 1930–31[38]
Fewest league goals scored
in a season: 26 in 38 matches,
First Division, 1912–13[39]
Most league goals conceded
in a season: 86 in 42 matches,
First Division, 1926–27 and
1927–28
Fewest league goals
conceded in a season: 17 in 38
matches, Premier League,
1998–99[40]
Points
Most points in a league
season:
Two points for a win: 66 (in
42 matches in 1930–31,
First Division)[41]
Three points for a win: 90
(in 38 matches in 2003–04,
Premier League)[42]
Fewest points in a League
season:
Two points for a win: 18 (in
38 matches in 1912–13,
First Division)[39]
Three points for a win: 51
(in 42 matches in 1994–95,
Premier League)
Attendances
Only competitive first-team
matches are considered.
Highest home attendance:
73,707 (against Lens, UEFA
Champions League, 25
November 1998) at Wembley
Stadium[b]
Highest attendance at
Highbury: 73,295 (against
Sunderland, First Division, 9
March 1935)[8]
Lowest attendance at
Highbury: 4,554 (against Leeds
United, First Division, 5 May
1966)[8]
Highest attendance at
Emirates Stadium: 60,161
(against Manchester United,
FA Premier League, 3
November 2007)[8]
Lowest attendance at
Emirates Stadium: 46,539
(against Shrewsbury, League
Cup, 20 September 2011)[44]
↑Jump back a section
National records
Arsenal hold many English
football records, including:
Most consecutive seasons in
the top flight: 93 (record
ongoing since 1919, though no
League football was played
due to war between 1939 and
1946)[45]
Longest unbeaten sequence
in the top flight: 49 (7 May
2003 – 16 October 2004)[46]
This includes the entire
2003–04 season unbeaten
in the League (38 matches),
with the side known as The
Invincibles as a result.
Longest unbeaten away
sequence in league football: 27
(5 April 2003 – 25 September
2004)[36]
Most consecutive league
wins: 14 (10 February 2002
and 24 August 2002) (other
teams also achieved 14 wins
but not in the top flight)[37]
Most consecutive league
titles: 3 (1931–32, 1932–33,
1933–34) (joint record with 3
other clubs).[47]
Most consecutive scoring
league games in league
football: 55 (19 May 2001 – 30
November 2002)[36]
Most consecutive scoring
away matches: 27 (19 May
2001 – 23 November 2002)[48]
Most away goals scored in a
league season: 60 (1930–31)
[49]
Most goals by a top flight
league winners: 127 (1930–31)
Most goals by a single
player in a top flight game: 7,
Ted Drake for Arsenal v Aston
Villa (away), 14 Dec 1935[50]
Highest scoring draw in
English football: – 6–6 away
v Leicester City (21 April 1930)
[51]
Highest scoring League Cup
game: Reading 5-7 Arsenal,
fourth round, 30 October 2012.
[52]
Most players from one club
in an England starting line-up:
7 (14 November 1934 v. Italy –
the so-called “Battle of
Highbury”)[53]
Youngest player to play for
England: Theo Walcott, 17
years 75 days (30 May 2006,
England v. Hungary)[54]
Highest attendance in
League football: 83,260
( Manchester United v. Arsenal,
at Maine Road, First Division,
17 January 1948)
NB All of the top three
attendances in league
football occurred at Arsenal
games.[55]
Most league and cup doubles
– 3 (joint record with
Manchester United)[56]
First team to win FA Cup and
League Cup double: 1993[57]
Most FA Cup and League Cup
doubles: 1 (joint record with
Liverpool and Chelsea)[58]
↑Jump back a section
European statistics
Main article: Arsenal F.C. in
European football
↑Jump back a section
Global records
First team to use shirt
numbers during a game:
1927[59]
First team to play a match
broadcast live on radio: v
Sheffield United, 22 January
1927[60]
First team to play a match
broadcast live on television: v
Arsenal Reserves, 16
September 1937[61]
First team to play a match
broadcast live in 3D: v
Manchester United, 31 January
2010[62]
↑Jump back a section
Footnotes
1. ^ Unusually, Arsenal were
forced to play two matches on
the same day on 12 December
1896; while the first team took
on Loughborough in the
League, the reserves played
Leyton in the FA Cup. The
irony is that the reserves won
handsomely, 5–0 , whilst the
seniors suffered Arsenal’s
record League defeat.
Additionally, Arsenal lost 0–9
to Chelsea in a wartime London
Combination match on 21 April
1916, but this is not counted
as an official first-class
match.
2. ^ Arsenal were given
permission by the Football
Association to play their home
Champions League games at
Wembley Stadium. As Highbury
was limited to 38,000, the club
explored possible ways to
increase crowd capacity for
home games, later coming to a
consensus of constructing a
new stadium. Wembley hosted
Champions League matches in
1998–99 and 1999–2000
before Arsenal switched back
to Highbury for the 2000–01
season.[43]

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Posted November 16, 2011 by arsenalwonder

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